abucci

anthony.buc.ci

Hi, I'm Anthony and I'm a computer scientist

Recent twts from abucci

Nothing says “the pandemic is over” like having to check three separate data sources to decide whether it’s safe to get a haircut.

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In-reply-to » Long ago the baby grew mobile enough to start getting into things, especially toilets. We installed those plastic child-proof locks all over the house. Now, it feels very strange to use a toilet that does not have a lock on it.

@prologic@twtxt.net hmm maybe I have an especially rambunctious child lol

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In-reply-to » My deep thought of the day is that Twitter exists to monetize Brandolini's law.

@prologic@twtxt.net

Brandolini’s law, also known as the bullshit asymmetry principle, is an internet adage that emphasizes the effort of debunking misinformation, in comparison to the relative ease of creating it in the first place. It states that “The amount of energy needed to refute bullshit is an order of magnitude bigger than that needed to produce it.”

  1. Tweet bullshit
  2. Countless others think hard to refute the bullshit, making countless tweets, amplifying “engagement”
  3. ???
  4. Profit

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In-reply-to » Long ago the baby grew mobile enough to start getting into things, especially toilets. We installed those plastic child-proof locks all over the house. Now, it feels very strange to use a toilet that does not have a lock on it.

It’s as if, in my mind, toilets are now things that should be locked. Very strange.

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Long ago the baby grew mobile enough to start getting into things, especially toilets. We installed those plastic child-proof locks all over the house. Now, it feels very strange to use a toilet that does not have a lock on it.

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In-reply-to » To help combat spam -- Should we build an invite system? 🤔

I say that because one issue with an invite system is that it generates manual labor too. It could stop people from making spammy posts, sure. But it burdens someone with investigating potential new users, and if those new users are human and not bots, they can play nice till they get their account and then start posting spam anyway. It’s important to have layers of (semi-) automated systems so that the humans doing the ultimate moderating aren’t overwhelmed.

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In-reply-to » To help combat spam -- Should we build an invite system? 🤔

@prologic@twtxt.net Years ago I moderated a forum and found any and all of the following can help

  • IP blacklists preventing registration
  • CAPTCHA at registration time
  • Email confirmation at registration time
  • A “reputation” system limiting what new users can post
  • Setting all links in posts nofollow (kills the benefit of SEO spam)
  • Run through akismet before posts are posted (you could probably get spamassassin to do this too?)
  • Extremely ruthless blocking

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In-reply-to » @eaplmx Thanks bud 🤗

@eaplmx@twtxt.net what’s the practical difference between something being more important vs. valued more?

That said, caring for your health, avoiding being killed or maimed by a brutal disease for instance, is 100% more important than caring about whether tech companies are taking good care with your data. That’s pretty obvious. Half the United States is in that state, I think. At least.

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In-reply-to » @eaplmx Thanks bud 🤗

@brasshopper@twtxt.net @prologic@twtxt.net I’m of this mind too. I don’t think it’s that people don’t care. I think it’s that people have other, more important things to care about, that they don’t know enough to know the dangers involved, and even if they did they wouldn’t know what to do about it anyway. So they choose to put it aside, which is a fairly rational choice under those assumptions, if you think about it. What possible reason would someone have to care about slowly losing their rights because of Facebook’s lousy policies when they are spending all their time working, raising kids, caring for loved ones, worrying about COVID, worrying about inflation, etc etc etc? It’s too abstract, too far away, too easy to ignore. If we want them to care, we are obligated to teach them what’s at stake and help them see why they should care (and also not judge them if they decide not to care, because that’s part of it too–paternalistically dictating to people what they should and shouldn’t is no good)

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In-reply-to » @eaplmx Thanks bud 🤗

@eaplmx@twtxt.net Nuance is good, but I like to think that I have a nuance budget, and I choose to apply the nuance budget to things that deserve it. Cryptocurrency does not deserve nuance, in my personal view. It’s too dangerous, too polluting, too corrupted. It barely had merit to begin with.

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In-reply-to » web3 exists because circa 2016 or so, a bunch of venture capitalists figured out how to get a quick payday out of startups by getting them to issue a cryptocurrency ("Initial Coin Offering"), gifting a bunch of that currency to the VC at a discounted rate, and then pumping-and-dumping the rest. The VC avoids liability because the field is unregulated and even if it were the startup is guilty of whatever financial crimes might be present, not the VC. This happened to the tune of many many billions of dollars, flooding the world with cryptocurrencies that then everyone holding them had a vested interest in finding value for so that they din't end up empty handed. What we've watched transpire since is the unwinding of this criminal pyramid of financial bullshit.

@prologic@twtxt.net Another thing about it that really bothers me is that most (all?) blockchains are based ultimately on an append-only log, meaning there’s no ability to delete anything. The blockchain acolytes I’ve talked to don’t seem to care about how horrible that is from an infosec perspective.

Oh also also, at least some of these web3 things depend on a “security by obscurity” model where your super secret stuff is only protected by a long hash code that you’re supposed to keep secret, but can never change or transfer. So, if anyone finds out your super secret hash code, you can’t disavow it, or invalidate it, or revoke it, or anything–all your stuff is there for the taking, forevermore.

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In-reply-to » Android is Google Windows. I don't know why people get excited about it.

@prologic@twtxt.net I’ve had Android cell phones since I think Android 6? I’m on Android 11 now. I hate each new version that comes out more than I hated the last. They take more and more power away from you as a user by crippling the underlying linux-derived operating system, they amp up the surveillance capabilities, and they privilege their own apps more and more. Exactly how Microsoft did with Windows and Internet Explorer. It’s literally the same playbook.

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In-reply-to » Android is Google Windows. I don't know why people get excited about it.

@prologic@twtxt.net Microsoft is (was?) a large monopoly that uses (used?) its operating system to control the software industry to its own ends, users be damned. If there was ever a time when their offering was of value to people, they gave up any pretense of maintaining and improving that long ago.

Google is a large unaccountable monopoly that uses its operating system to control the software industry to its own ends, users be damned. If there was ever a time when their offering was of value to people, they gave up any pretense of maintaining and improving that long ago.

There was a time when Microsoft was nearly broken up by regulators for this behavior, but the US doesn’t fix any of its problems anymore so Google has been able to persist longer without repercussions.

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In-reply-to » web3 exists because circa 2016 or so, a bunch of venture capitalists figured out how to get a quick payday out of startups by getting them to issue a cryptocurrency ("Initial Coin Offering"), gifting a bunch of that currency to the VC at a discounted rate, and then pumping-and-dumping the rest. The VC avoids liability because the field is unregulated and even if it were the startup is guilty of whatever financial crimes might be present, not the VC. This happened to the tune of many many billions of dollars, flooding the world with cryptocurrencies that then everyone holding them had a vested interest in finding value for so that they din't end up empty handed. What we've watched transpire since is the unwinding of this criminal pyramid of financial bullshit.

@prologic@twtxt.net Oh I know, it’s horrible on nearly every level, including how many people end up believing things that just aren’t true because these web3 zombies push it so hard.

Calling blockchain decentralized is hilarious. Why people believe that particular one baffles me.

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In-reply-to » web3 exists because circa 2016 or so, a bunch of venture capitalists figured out how to get a quick payday out of startups by getting them to issue a cryptocurrency ("Initial Coin Offering"), gifting a bunch of that currency to the VC at a discounted rate, and then pumping-and-dumping the rest. The VC avoids liability because the field is unregulated and even if it were the startup is guilty of whatever financial crimes might be present, not the VC. This happened to the tune of many many billions of dollars, flooding the world with cryptocurrencies that then everyone holding them had a vested interest in finding value for so that they din't end up empty handed. What we've watched transpire since is the unwinding of this criminal pyramid of financial bullshit.

yeah, a digital currency that is quick and easy to exchange with anyone in the world has a lot of possible virtues. But cryptocurrency is not that, and it was never meant to be. That’s a libertarian fever dream that grounded out the way it did because that’s what unconstrained libertarianism always turns into.

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web3 exists because circa 2016 or so, a bunch of venture capitalists figured out how to get a quick payday out of startups by getting them to issue a cryptocurrency (“Initial Coin Offering”), gifting a bunch of that currency to the VC at a discounted rate, and then pumping-and-dumping the rest. The VC avoids liability because the field is unregulated and even if it were the startup is guilty of whatever financial crimes might be present, not the VC. This happened to the tune of many many billions of dollars, flooding the world with cryptocurrencies that then everyone holding them had a vested interest in finding value for so that they din’t end up empty handed. What we’ve watched transpire since is the unwinding of this criminal pyramid of financial bullshit.

web3 does not solve any problems that aren’t already solved by significantly more efficient techniques. It is not an answer to the “centralization” of Web 2.0. You can’t solve a social, economic, and political problem (monopolization) with Ponzi scheme.

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In-reply-to » @eaplmx Thanks bud 🤗

@prologic@twtxt.net Oh, I don’t know, web3 consumes hundreds of time more electricity to solve a problem nobody actually has using techniques that have never been proved to work better than the 40+-year-old algorithms that already do the same things.

That, and that they enable unbelievable consolidation of wealth into the hands of fewer and fewer people, as well as criminal activity, from minor scams all the way up to massive ransomeware attacks that put hospitals and basic infrastructure at risk.

There is nothing good about cryptocurrency, and very very very much wrong with it. It should have been eradicated long ago, but I guess we don’t fix broken things anymore.

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In-reply-to » Guys, I have a bad news, I went through the twtxt-osphere : - I found 1289 twtxt account - among those 721 are accessible ( 712 http / 9 gemini / 0 gopher) - but only 111 account are still active in 2022 :S (107 http / 4 gemini / 0 gopher).

@tkanos@twtxt.net check it out, I’m the new kid on the block and I’m already 34th! 🤓💪

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In-reply-to » @tkanos a quick question, I'm using twet (thanks for the recommendation), how do the clients announce between them that you have replied to a previous twt?

@eaplmx@twtxt.net I’m pretty sure webmention would work for this. It’s how the rest of the IndieWeb tends to care care of things like posting comments to blogs. It’s pretty simple–there’s a REST endpoint you hit when you reply to a post, and then an endpoint that gets called on the recipient’s side that decides what to do with the webmention (ignore it, post it somewhere, alert the writer, other). You put the necessary endpoint(s) in <link rel="webmention"... and <link rel="pingback"... tags in the HTML of the pages you want to have webmention support, so it’s pretty unintrusive.

You can play with it right now by signing into https://webmention.io with a yarn.social or other IndeiAuth-compatiable web site. I’m almost certain there are self-hostable web mention servers, or you can use webmention.io or one of the other ones.

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In-reply-to » If I have the choice between a Linux and an Apple, I really don't know which one I would choose.

@prologic@twtxt.net I’m not even sure how to rate my vision. I’m fortunate enough to retain a decent amount of peripheral vision. But my central vision is bad (macular dystrophy), with numerous blindspots scattered throughout. I can only really see things if I look askance at them–when I look directly at an object, it’s as if it’s not there. Right now my vision is stable but it degraded steadily for many years and could start degrading again at any time. Pre-COVID I’d get checked yearly and was looking into clinical trials for potential treatments, but that all fell by the wayside. Someday I’ll pick it up again.

Anyway, I can still use computers pretty effectively, which I’m thankful for, but keep the zoom at 2x-4x basically all the time. I definitely can’t drive a car or anything like that. I frequently take pictures of things with my phone and then view the picture zoomed in to see whatever it was that I wanted to see.

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In-reply-to » If I have the choice between a Linux and an Apple, I really don't know which one I would choose.

@prologic@twtxt.net For what it’s worth, I am low vision myself and have sworn by KDE/plasma (and KDE/compiz before it) since 2008 at least. There was a blip there when KDE initially switched to plasma, but other than that their full screen zoom was by far my favorite and still is. I normally use a desktop workstation with KDE/plasma, but my laptop runs GNOME and their full screen zoom works OK but isn’t great. I find Windows 10’s pretty unusable, to the point that when I’m cursed with having to use that operating system I remote desktop into it from a Linux machine and use KDE/plasma’s full screen zoom lol.

YMMV!

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We have a printer here at home that I use maybe once every six months, but that the cat sleeps on every day. I think I have to accept reality and start calling it the cat bed that has a print function.

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In-reply-to » Sometime around mid-August Google decided to start sending a bunch of my coworkers' emails to the Spam folder for no apparent reason 😠 Now I'm sifting through there trying to figure out what I missed and what to do about it.

After I marked some 30 emails as not spam, Google automatically re-classified them as spam and put them back in the spam folder. Something is really wrong.

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Sometime around mid-August Google decided to start sending a bunch of my coworkers’ emails to the Spam folder for no apparent reason 😠 Now I’m sifting through there trying to figure out what I missed and what to do about it.

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In-reply-to » I was bored tonight, so I created a generator of twtxt file using git (https://github.com/tkanos/gitwtxt) : - Each commit is a message - Each branch is a thread --> Then I generate a twtxt file out of it.

@tkanos@twtxt.net Yes, that seems to do it….now, do I want to set up a yarn pod to host my git commits 🤔

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In-reply-to » I was bored tonight, so I created a generator of twtxt file using git (https://github.com/tkanos/gitwtxt) : - Each commit is a message - Each branch is a thread --> Then I generate a twtxt file out of it.

@tkanos@twtxt.net this is cool. It could probably be adapted to generate a twtxt file out of a project’s git commit history, which means you could then generate a yarn.social pod for any project you wanted, and then ……..

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In-reply-to » I feel like cellular phone plans these days are a lot like cable TV plans, with the bundling they do. I almost never make voice calls and rarely text. Primarily I use data, and could/would fully switch out of the telephone network if I had a reasonable data-only plan. However, almost no one offers data-only plans, and when they are offered they are way more expensive per gigabyte than ordinary cell phone plans with unlimited voice/text options.

Unsurprisingly, I’m not the only person who has thought about this: https://superuser.com/questions/748154/use-a-smartphone-as-a-dial-up-modem

One of the answers in that posts even links to an academic article about on the subject! A Data Modem for GSM Voice Channel

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